Allied Media Conference 2013: “communications, art, technology, education and social justice”

If you’ve been following this blog, I’m sure you’re already in-the-know about the Allied Media Conference 2013 that’s happening right now.

Matter of fact, if it wasn’t for a recent bout with bronchitis + laryngitis, I’d love to be in Detroit along with all the amazing activists, artists, and cultural organizers working at the intersections of comms, art, tech, education & SJ.  Thankfully, there’s PLENTY of great content to follow online to e-share in the uniquely grassroots and participatory vibe that AMC does so well.

Make sure to check out http://amc.alliedmedia.org to follow their blog, along with the happenings on social media:

I can’t wait to see all the videos, blog posts, and recaps after this weekend.  Chime in the comments below if you were there, and/or feel free to suggest any other sites with additional info, photos/videos, or notes from the conference participants!

Who’s AMP & what’s AMC all about?

A few excerpts from their sites:

Allied Media Projects cultivates media strategies for a more just and creative world.

From the intersection of communications, art, technology, education and social justice, we share and develop models for transforming ourselves and our communities. Read our mission and network principles.  AMP organizes the annual Allied Media Conference. Our local programs innovate media-based practices in education, economic development and community organizing.

The Allied Media Conference cultivates strategies for a more just and creative world. We come together to share tools and tactics for transforming our communities through media-based organizing.

AMC Vision

PARTICIPATORY MEDIA TO TRANSFORM OUR SELVES & OUR WORLD

The Allied Media Conference advances our visions for a just and creative world. It is a laboratory for media-based solutions to the matrix of life-threatening problems we face. Since our founding in 1999, we have evolved our definition of media, and the role it can play in our lives – from zines to video-blogging to breakdancing, to communicating solidarity and creating justice. Each conference builds off the previous one and plants the seeds for the next. Ideas and relationships evolve year-round, incorporating new networks of media-makers, technologists and social justice organizers. We draw strength from our converging movements to face the challenges and opportunities of our current moment. We are ready to create, connect and transform.

CREATE

The AMC supports learning of all different kinds and at all different levels. The workshops are hands-on and participatory. Knowledge is passed horizontally rather than from the top down. Everyone teaches and everyone learns. At the AMC, media creation is not only about personal expression, but about transformation – of ourselves and the structures of power around us. We create media that exposes, investigates, resists, heals, builds confidence and radical hope, incites dialogue and debate. We demystify technology, not only learning how to use it, but how to take it apart, fix it and build our own.  We do it ourselves and as communities, connecting across geographic and generational boundaries.

CONNECT

The AMC is a network of networks – youth organizations, international solidarity activists, anti-violence organizers, technologists, educators, media reform advocates, alternative economists, musicians and artists, disability activists, and many others – all using media in innovative ways. Some of these networks have sprouted from the conference, grown over the course of the year, then reconvened in Detroit larger and healthier. Others have adopted the AMC as an annual point of convergence and a space to forge new relationships. Through cycles of collaboration, question-asking and experimentation, our networks continue to grow, bringing new analysis, and new tools to the AMC every year.

TRANSFORM

The deeper our networks grow, the greater our capacity grows to take collective actions to transform our world. We recognize that transformation happens through our everyday movements. At the AMC, we develop new leaders and new forms of leadership, design new methods of problem-solving, cultivate the visions of our communities and build our power to make those visions real. Our strategies for transformation don’t begin or end with the three days of the conference. They evolve in our lives and our work throughout the year.

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[Quick links] Arts & Cultural Innovation Resources Roundup

Thinker thinks about how to take sun burst shot
Flickr user: DavidYuWeb (CC licensed, some rights reserved)

As part of the team of Fellows hosting tonight’s event on how R&D fits into arts and cultural innovation, I’m posting just a sampling of quick links that I’ve found helpful in getting my brain into a more creative, innovative space for the discussion.

Note: stay tuned to EmergingSF.org for a fuller list of great links which EAP will update after we collect more input from the community and from the event!

Innovation

From ArtsFwd: Next Practices for Arts Leaders (hands down, one of my favorite arts blogs!)

Research

  • The James Irvine Foundation’s interactive “Arts Innovation Fund” Report
  • Arts Research Center at UC Berkeley is a think tank for the arts, a genuinely interdisciplinary space that brings people together–from across the university and beyond the university, from across the arts and beyond the arts–for unexpected conversations, collaborations, and community-building. “

Thinkers

Network

Development

Misc Ideas & Thought Pieces!

Last but not least: use #BYOID on Twitter to follow/join the convo!


The focus of this short list is nonprofit arts/cultural innovations, but I’m keen to find other examples of more cross-sectoral R&D/innovation partnerships working with the arts sector (e.g. tech, social entrepreneurship, city governments, community-based nonprofits, social services, health care, etc.). 

So please feel free to chime in the comments with other links or resources I should add!

Thanks 🙂

May 18, International Museum Day: (Memory + Creativity) = Social Change

I’m a huge museum nerd, so it was a nice surprise to discover this great annual celebration recently! (Thank goodness for the magical arts interwebs.)

According to the International Museum Day website, it all began with the International Council of Museums (ICOM) in 1977 to “raise awareness on how important museums are in the development of society.”  Over 30,000 institutions representing 129 countries participated last year, making it a truly global event.

On this day, participating museums interpret an issue that concerns all cultural organisations. International Museum Day is also a fantastic opportunity for museum professionals to meet their public. At the heart of society, museums are institutions dedicated to its development.

Traditionally, International Museum Day is organised around 18 May. It can last a day, a weekend or a whole week, the objective being to meet at the museum with the motto: “Museums are an important means of cultural exchange, enrichment of cultures and development of mutual understanding, cooperation and peace among peoples”.

2013’s theme is “Museums (Memory + Creativity) = Social Change”.  ICOM describes this as:

The richness of our historical heritage, preserved and displayed by museums, together with the inventiveness and vitality that have characterised the museum sector’s action in recent years, are where the strength of museum institutions lies today. Reconciling their traditional mission of conservation with the creativity necessary for their revival and the development of their audiences – this is the evolution that museums are trying to undertake, with the strong belief that their presence and actions can transform society constructively.

This truly optimistic theme in the form of an equation dynamically gathers several concepts that are essential to defining what a museum is today, highlighting the universal nature of those institutions and their positive influence on society. It summarises the complexity of museum tasks and recalls that they are meant to contribute to community development and gathering together.

I truly admire their encouraging tone towards educational innovation and the ongoing development of the museum as a community hub that can respond creatively to evolving public needs.  As arts administrators and advocates, I feel that aligning with social change values is a natural way to connect to our audiences, the improvement of our immediate communities, and to the core of our educational missions.

poster_IMD2013_tri_180_05

ICOM outlines 5 sub-themes using the lens of social change which form clear, strong advocacy points:

  1. Informal education structures: Museums educate in a recreational way; they are places of initiation without obligation that foster knowledge through continually renewed means.
  2. A social space rooted in its territory: Museums play a role in the identity and dynamism of their territory. Through their action, they contribute to promote the past of their territory and build its future.
  3. An intergenerational link: Museums keep the relationship between a community and its history alive. They are spaces for dialogue between generations.
  4. Displaying heritage in a modern way: Museums have quickly been able to seize the communication and mediation opportunities offered by new media and have broken away from the old-fashioned image they once had.
  5. Innovative practices for a better conservation: Conservation devices are improving and the museum is becoming a real laboratory where work techniques continue to evolve.

Learn more and get involved:

  • Find activities at museums near you: in North America
  • On Twitter, use the hashtag #IMD2013 
  • Follow their Facebook page
  • Download their full PDF press kit here

Arts and culture events, Spring SF [Part 2] May 9 “Social Mixer” and May 13 “Re-imagining the Box”

Welcome to part 2 of this post series featuring arts & culture events from my Emerging Arts Professionals fellowship program.  Rounding out the final two “Spring Series” public events: an EAP Social Mixer and “Re-imagining the Box”

But before we dive in, please make sure to save the date: June 3rd for our Annual Conference, “Emergence”.  I’ll add links and more info soon, promise!  And as always, get the latest and greatest from emergingsf.org and on Twitter @emergingarts.

 

Emerging Arts Professionals SF Bay Area – Spring Mixer
Thursday, May 9, 6:00 – 8:00 p.m.
Pro Arts – 150 Frank H Ogawa Plaza  Oakland, CA 94612
FREE! RSVP via Eventbrite

You asked and we answered! We know you love our heady panel discussions and all but, perhaps even more, you love to let your hair down with us.

Come network, mingle, and explore one of Oakland’s leading galleries! Meet fellow Bay Area artists and arts sector workers over drinks and snacks at Pro Arts, and learn more about Emerging Arts Professionals (EAP). See over 400 pieces in Pro Arts’ East Bay Open Studios Preview Exhibition and enter our business card raffle for some special art prizes. Bring your cards and a desire to meet like-minded folks!

Mixer is FREE but please REGISTER HERE

………….

Re-imagining the Box on May 13 at SOMArts

Re-imagining The Box

“Emerging Arts Professionals / San Francisco Bay Area invites you to an evening of open forum discussion to assess where and how R&D fits into arts and cultural innovation.

Join us on May 13 at SOMArts. Register today!

When other sectors are experiencing growth at exponential rates, how can we as arts leaders re-prioritize and re-imagine the R&D process to create impactful and innovative works in our communities? Does R&D necessary lead to innovation–and what does innovation in the arts field even look like at this point?

Re-imagining the Box
R&D, Innovation, and Future Thinkers in the Arts
Monday, May 13, 6 – 8 p.m.
SOMArts Cutural Center

We’re conducting a little R&D about R&D, with plans to create a real resource for those in the field who are interested in the now, new, and next.  Who are the future thinkers in the field? How can we make forward thinking in the arts a higher priority in cycles of support?

We’ve invited some future thinkers of our own to get the conversation started, but we need you to bring you own ideas (#BYOID) to make it count!

Speakers include:

Mat Dryhurst, Artup and GAFTA; Jess Curtis, Director/Choreographer/Performer; Jayna Swartzman, Bay Area, Center for Cultural Innovation; Julie Potter, YBCA

Our ultimate goal with this forum is to create a resource informed from your ideas. It will offer a space to share and learn about ways our peers continue to push the field into new directions–but to get things started, we need you!”

 
We hope to see you all there for a fun, interactive, and creative collaboration on Monday night at SOMarts.  Thanks for supporting our events and stay tuned for updated event recaps soon!

[infographic] Who’s Who in Public Interest Design

www.publicinterestdesign.org/people

Happy new year all!  I hope 2013 brings you a fresh perspective on the days ahead with renewed vigor and creativity.

On that note,  I’m sharing this rockin’ infographic titled “the Public Interest Design 100″ from a great site I follow at publicinterestdesign.

Designer Megan Jett highlighted 100 of the most talented, social progressives  working in various sectors at “the intersection of design and service.” The list includes nonprofits, educators, funders, organizers, policymakers, and artists.  I’ve personally used the list to curate a new list of folks to follow on Twitter to keep my “new ideas” streams topped-off  throughout the year.

Explore their process story and see the full, high-quality image versions at http://www.publicinterestdesign.org/people.

Update: May 2013 – Check out their freshly released “Global Public Interest Design 100” version.

https://i0.wp.com/www.publicinterestdesign.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/PID100FINAL6203.jpg
http://www.publicinterestdesign.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/PID100FINAL6203.jpg

P.S. If you loved this infographic, then make sure to also check out their Public Interest Design: Products, Places, & Processes page showcasing the exhibition at the Autodesk Gallery in San Francisco. (The exhibition opened for display from October 4, 2012 and will be up/traveling for up to 5 more years).