[quick link] Millennial Leaders Training in Art & Social Change

As the last few weeks of 2015 wind down, you might start thinking about the new year and planning how to evolve in your artistic/activist practice. So I’m sharing this quick link for an arts activism program in Oakland next summer aimed at building millennial leadership.

Art & Social Change: InterPlay for Millennial Leaders

interplayA training program for artists and activists age 18-35, aimed at exploring “ways to help people play with difficult issues, listen to and share the wisdom of their bodies and tell stories in ways that are direct, personal, and transformational.”

The program teaches participants how to “lead with creative, embodied InterPlay tools and techniques used around the world in peacemaking, prisons, classrooms, theaters, homes, places of worship, and health care.”

They’re accepting applications for July 2016, so visit their site and check out their brochure for details.

While I’m not personally familiar with or affiliated with the org (so I can’t necessarily endorse the specific methods, trainers, etc.) but I found the idea of such an innovative program compelling and intriguing enough to share!

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[quick link] Impact! Designing for Social Change

Today’s quick link > “Impact! Designing for Social Change” offers graduate-level intensive workshops for professionals and students interested in design for social advocacy.

Hosted at the School for Visual Arts,  the workshops feature sessions with faculty of designers, innovators, and social entrepreneurs. The program addresses the intersection of commercial and non-profit interests in this emerging “social design” sector:

To remain competitive, corporations are looking for innovation and impact in the area of social change as it relates to their businesses. The non-profit world is seeking new ways to support their constituencies through design strategy. This six-week summer intensive will introduce participants to the growing field of design for social advocacy.

Their impressive curriculum subject areas sound absolutely fascinating and so right up this blog’s alley.  (That’s #AwesomeDesignForSocialChange Alley, btw). I honestly wish I was still living near NYC  so I could participate!  (Also, I realize I’ve posted this a bit late and past the current Summer session enrollment date, but just sign up for alerts on the site to get news on their upcoming Fall 2013 session.)

The Impact! site is chock-full of resources and useful info, including archived webinar sessions on topics like:

Also don’t miss browsing their gallery of past Impact Projects which feature learning-in-action projects in social entrepreneurship, community education, environment, health, and politics to name a few.

Design Effect

New Girl

Local Focus

[infographic] Who’s Who in Public Interest Design

www.publicinterestdesign.org/people

Happy new year all!  I hope 2013 brings you a fresh perspective on the days ahead with renewed vigor and creativity.

On that note,  I’m sharing this rockin’ infographic titled “the Public Interest Design 100″ from a great site I follow at publicinterestdesign.

Designer Megan Jett highlighted 100 of the most talented, social progressives  working in various sectors at “the intersection of design and service.” The list includes nonprofits, educators, funders, organizers, policymakers, and artists.  I’ve personally used the list to curate a new list of folks to follow on Twitter to keep my “new ideas” streams topped-off  throughout the year.

Explore their process story and see the full, high-quality image versions at http://www.publicinterestdesign.org/people.

Update: May 2013 – Check out their freshly released “Global Public Interest Design 100” version.

https://i0.wp.com/www.publicinterestdesign.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/PID100FINAL6203.jpg
http://www.publicinterestdesign.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/PID100FINAL6203.jpg

P.S. If you loved this infographic, then make sure to also check out their Public Interest Design: Products, Places, & Processes page showcasing the exhibition at the Autodesk Gallery in San Francisco. (The exhibition opened for display from October 4, 2012 and will be up/traveling for up to 5 more years).